Upon Westminister Bridge Analysis Questions Answers

Upon Westminster Bridge Questions Answers 

Today we are going to have some important questions answers from the the poem "Upon Westminster Bridge". These are the very important questions answers from  the poem that will help to analyse the poem "Upon Westminister Bridge."


Composed Upon Westminster Bridge
               (September 3, 1802)
                    ---by William Wordsworth 

 

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Questions Answers Analysis




Earth has not anything to show more fair:

Dull would he be of soul who could pass by

A sight so touching in its majesty:

This City now doth, like a garment, wear

The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,

Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie

Open unto the fields, and to the sky;

All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.

Never did sun more beautifully steep

In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;

Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!

The river glideth, at his own sweet will:

Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;

And all that mighty heart is lying still!


Click on the Play Button below for Analysis and Explanation of the sonnet Upon Westminster Bridge 



Important Questions Answers  from Upon Westminster Bridge                                        


(1) How does the poet present the London city in the poem, "Upon Westminster Bridge."

Ans:- The poet, William Wordsworth in his sonnet "Upon Westminster Bridge" gives a pictorial description of the beauty of the London city and expresses his feelings of wonder and appreciation at the scenic beauty of the London city viewed from the Westminster Bridge early in the morning. Everything looks beautifully bathed in the light of the early morning sun. A calmness prevails all around the city. Here the poet expresses the tranquil beauty of the London city which is at rest at dawn. Everything is glittering in the smokeless air. Even the man made objects like towers, domes, temples, ships are clearly visible under the open smokeless sky. To express the tranquil beauty of the London city, the poet has personified the city which seems that has worn a garment of morning beauty. Thus the poet gives a different aspect to the conventional romantic poetry through the glorification of the sun-bathed and silent city of London.

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(2) Give the significance of the title of the poem, "Upon Westminster Bridge".

Ans:- It is learnt from Dorothy Wordsworth's (sister of William Wordsworth) journal that the poet William Wordsworth was inspired by the early morning scene of London city viewed from the Westminster Bridge while going to Dover on July 31, 1802. Thus, the sonnet "Upon Westminister Bridge" is an exaltation of the London city which casted a deep influence on the poet at that time. Everything looked bathed and glittering in the early rays of the sun. The poet was deeply moved by the tranquil beauty of the London city. Only a person without senses could ignore such a scenic beauty. So the poet's feelings of wonder and appreciation at the sight of the city occasioned the poem. The poet could not have such a panoramic beauty of the city if he did not cross the Westminster Bridge at that time. So, the title of the poem is clearly indicative of the time and place when the poet felt so. The title also informs the readers about the theme of the poem. So the title is quite appropriate. 

(3) Discuss William Wordsworth as a poet of nature after reading the poem, "Upon Westminister Bridge".

Ans:- William Wordsworth is widely recognized as a poet of nature with most of his poems beautifully describing his profound and ardent love for nature. Nature in Wordsworth's poem, we can say that something to be throughly experienced, contemplated and worshipped. For Wordsworth, nature is an essential part of our existence and human beings should attempt to be one with nature. 
           "Upon Westminster Bridge" is one of the rare poems of Wordsworth where he gives a different dimension to the conventional nature. Here, he personifies the city of London where everything is glittering in the smokeless air. Even, the river Thames flows at its own sweet will. This is like his feelings of wonder and joy for the unconventional natural landscape. Thus, the poem celebrates the poet's worship to nature and we can say that Wordsworth is essentially a poet of nature.

(4) Why does Wordsworth invoke God in his poem, "Upon Westminster Bridge"? What does he mean by "mighty heart"?

Ans:-  William Wordsworth is much profoundly moved by the whole spectacle of the city of London in the early morning that his strongly felt emotions come through the invocation to God with an exclamation. He seems to thank God as he has been blessed to observe the profound and tranquil beauty of nature. It fills his mind with an aesthetic joy. Wonder-struck, the poet seems to have a feeling of childlike joy and rapture. So, out of gratitude he has invoked God for His benign gift.
                By the expression "mighty heart", the poet personifies the city of London by comparing with the heart of a giant. The city is the capital city and the epi-center of all activities. A giant with its mighty figure roars when it awakes. Similarly, the city is full of noise in the daytime. The din and bustle of the city is like the roar of a giant. But the city at dawn in deep slumber is perfectly still and motionless. It seems that a roaring giant is lulled to sleep. Thus, the London city is metaphorically described as 'mighty heart' to create a sense of awe and admiration.



(5) "A sight so touching in its majesty" -- What is the sight referred to here? How is the poet moved by the sight?

Ans:- The beautiful spectacle of the city of London glittering brightly in the light of the early morning sun is the sight referred to here.
           The poet feels that the sight of the London city in the early morning is highly impressive in its splendour. This sight can be compared to any beautiful thing on earth. The city looks splendid in the melted light of the golden sun. In its golden light everything looks marvellous to the poet under the smokeless air. The poet feels that the scenic beauty of the London city certainly will touch all hearts and appeal to all sensitive souls. Apart from its glowing beauty, the poet discovers a calm contentment that prevails all around the city. The poet is highly impressed by the tranquil nature of the city. Even in the profound silence, the poet hears the sweet murmur of the river Thames flowing at its own sweet will. He utters in wonder, "Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!" Infact, the city with its majestic beauty and calmness gives the poet infinite joy and rapture that soothe his soul.

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(6) "This city now doth, like a garment wear/ The beauty of the morning;"
 --What is the 'city' referred to here? Explain the line in context of the poem.

Ans:- The 'city' refers to here is the London city. The poet views the city while crossing the West Minister Bridge. He is so much impressed by the scenic beauty of the London city that in his poetic imagination he compares the city to a lady throughly dressed in the morning beauty.
            The scenic tranquil beauty of the London city bathed in the golden rays of the early morning sun creates so much joy and rapture in the poet's mind that he compares the London city to a lady using literary device simile. A lovely lady wears nice dress to add loveliness to her. So is the case with the city. The golden glow of the sun is like a gorgeous dress which the city seems to put on to make more attractive. The word 'now' in the line shows the time of the day when the poet feels so. May be when the morning is over, the city will be forced to change the beautiful garment. Infact, the poet had personified the city to invest the city with an unearthly beauty. 

(7) "Never did sun more beautifully steep 
In his first splendour, valley, rock or hill; "
 -- Briefly explain the significance of the line.

Ans: Wordsworth became amused to see the beauty of the London City in the early morning standing upon the West Minster Bridge. The rising sun adds a splendour and glory to the scene of nature. The sun pours a shower of brightness upon valleys, rocks, hill and everything looks so splendid. The first splendour refers to the first sun beams in the morning. The poet has never seen such magnificent beauty at dawn in the City of London before. As the sky is free from smoke and dust every object looks bright and glittering. The poet is so fascinated with sun beams that he becomes spellbound.  The sun's first splendour touches the poet's heart vividly. 

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